The Most Wonderful Time

Growing up in Bismarck, around Christmastime, I did a lot of caroling. The older I got, the more caroling I did. It started from just a weekend concert in Central Dakota Children's Choirs' third and fourth grade group, Jubilate, and through time it evolved into a Christmas caroling mania in Bismarck High School's New Generation Jazz, as well as several other ensembles, and I also participated in my church worship team. When I joined Bismarck State College's concert choir, women's choir, and Chamber Singers, I caroled with all of them around this time of year. Though I know Christmas is a holiday that celebrates religious matters and not music, it is somehow not the same Christmas without it. 

It is still a ChristmasManchesterChristmasMarket.jpg, it is just admired in a different way: there are lights strewn around campus, 
and there is
 a glorious giving tree overlooking the HUB. The streets of Ormskirk are arched with glowing, snowflake emblems of blue and white. All of Liverpool One twinkles with different lights, and there are pine trees so large they put the campus tree of generosity to shame. Also, there is a life-sized nativity scene in a giant, beautiful box that makes it look like a gift for the entire world to enjoy. One stark difference of Christmas time in England is the Christmas Markets. They really up the ante.

The International Office at Edge Hill organized a trip to the Manchester Christmas Market. The closest thing that I can compare it to is Art in the Park, but in December instead of July. Christmas Markets are like that, except it is about 40 degrees Fahrenheit out, and there is a different assortment of food: mulled wine, Irish coffee, German Sausage, Turkish Delight, chocolate covered fruits, bubble and squeak, and it is all amazing. There are live musicians, and plenty of things to buy. All around, it is just fun. 

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