Dorm Life

DormBed.jpgThere are several sets of dorms on campus that have a variety of designs, ranging from minimalist to modern. I am staying in the back halls, the oldest and least expensive of all dorms, which also happens to be where most of the international students live. All students are given the option to pay extra for a more modern dorm, but I chose to say in the back halls. I would characterize the hall as more minimalist, but still maintaining the quaint charm of older style.
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I share a single bathroom and shower with eight other students, a kitchen with about 16 other students, and a common room with the entire building of students (I am not sure how many there are, but I have to say about 32). That may sound kind of cramped, but all of the students are courteous about their shower time. There are many places to hang out on campus other than the common rooms, and I rarely have to bother with the cramped kitchen because a majority of my meals come from THE HUB (no one ever spells it in lowercase, I never asked why).

My dorm room itself is humble, but it is homey and it still contains everything I need. However, I have added a few things to make it cozier. For example, it did not come with the miniature fridge (thanks, mom!), the lamp on my nightstand, the knitted throw blanket, the extra towels (the school provided me with one, but I bought a few more), or the extra pillowDormdifferentangle.jpg (the room originally had one). Almost everything else was provided: the bed, the comforter, the desk, the night stand, the book shelf, the sink, and it all came with several large and deep cupboards for storage. If I was living here long term, I would have invested more to make it even cozier, but I did not because I know I cannot bring most of it back to the states.

Regardless, it is a nice, temporary home.

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